Mycena tilted

Mycena inclinata Mycena inclinata Mycena inclinata

Mycena inclinata

Systematics:

  • Department: Basidiomycota (Basidiomycetes)
  • Subdivision: Agaricomycotina (Agaricomycetes)
  • Class: Agaricomycetes (Agaricomycetes)
  • Subclass: Agaricomycetidae
  • Order: Agaricales (Agaric or Lamellar)
  • Family: Mycenaceae (Mycene)
  • Genus: Mycena (Mycena)
  • Species: Mycena inclinata
    Other names for the mushroom:
  • Mycenae motley

or

Mycenae motley

Mycena inclinata

Inclined mycena (Mycena inclinata) is a mushroom of the Mycene family, from the Mycene genus, is characterized as a reducent. Widely distributed in the European continent, Australia, Asia, North Africa, North America. The inclined mycene species also includes two special subspecies, which were discovered and described in Borneo. The synonym is variegated mycena.

External description of the mushroom

The flesh of the inclined mycena is fragile, white and very thin, has no smell at all, but some mushrooms still have a barely noticeable unpleasant aroma.

The hymenophore of this type of fungus is represented by the lamellar type, and the plates in it are not too often, but not rare. They grow to the peduncle with teeth, have a light, sometimes grayish or pinkish color, cream shade.

The diameter of the cap of this type of mushroom is 2-4 cm, its shape initially resembles an egg, then it becomes blunt-annular. At the edges, the cap is lighter, uneven and chopped, gradually becomes convex-outstretched, with a noticeable tubercle in its central part. Sometimes in mature mushrooms a dimple is visible at the top, and the edges of the cap become curved and covered with wrinkles. Color – from brown-gray to pale brown, sometimes turns into fawn. The tubercle in the mature inclined mycene often turns brown.

Mycena inclinata Habitat and period of fruiting

The inclined mycena (Mycena inclinata) grows mainly in groups, choosing for its development the trunks of fallen trees, old rotten stumps. Especially often you can see this type of mushroom near oak trees in the forest. The most active fruiting of the inclined mycena occurs in the period from June to October, and you can see this type of fungus in mixed and deciduous forests. The fruit bodies of the inclined mycene prefer to grow on deciduous tree species (oak, rarely birch). Fruiting annually, they are found in groups and whole colonies.

Edibility

Mycena inclinata is characterized as an inedible mushroom. In some sources, it is considered conditionally edible. In any case, it is not toxic.

Similar species, distinctive features from them

Research has allowed to prove a high level of genetic similarity of mycene inclined with such mycene species as:

  • Mycena crocata;
  • Mycena aurantiomarginata;
  • Mycena leaiana.

The outwardly inclined mycene is very similar to Mycena maculata and bell-shaped mycene.

Remarks

For the first time the description of the inclined mycene was made in 1838. A Swedish mycologist named Elias Fries named the new mushroom species Agaricus inclinatus. Its current name, the tilted mycene, received in 1872, in the scientific works of another mycologist, whose name was Lucien Kele. Agaricus galericulatus calopus, described by the same Fries in 1873, and Mycena galericulata calopus, used in the scientific works of Peter Carsten in 1879, are also synonyms for the name of the represented species of mushrooms.

Mycena inclinata Mycena inclinata Mycena inclinata

Photo of the Mycena mushroom tilted from the recognition questions:

Mycena inclinata - Mycena incline Mycena inclinata - Mycena incline Mycena inclinata - Mycena incline 2018.11.21 Mycena inclinata - Mycena incline Mycena inclinata - Mycena incline Mycena inclinata - Mycena incline 2019.02.21 Alexander Mycena inclinata - Mycena incline Mycena inclinata - Mycena incline Mycena inclinata - Mycena incline Mycena inclinata - Mycena incline 2018.06.08 Alexander Mycena inclinata - Mycena incline Mycena inclinata - Mycena incline Mycena inclinata - Mycena incline Mycena inclinata - Mycena incline 2018.09.20 Igor

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Hunting, Fishing and Mushrooms: a magazine for hunters and fishers.
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