Lepiots – poisonous mushrooms

Lepiots are inedible mushrooms of the champignon family. Mostly found in coniferous and mixed forests, on forest edges, clearings and pastures. Owners of household plots note the accumulation of poisonous lepiots in their gardens from mid-summer to the end of September. The lepiot fungus grows both singly and in groups.

Below is a description and photo of various types of poisonous lepiota: chestnut, rough and comb. You can also learn about the doubles of the mushroom and its use.

Mushroom lepiota chestnut

Category: inedible.

The name of the chestnut lepiota (Lepiota castanea) is translated from ancient Greek as 'scales'.

Hat (diameter 2-6 cm): often cracked, in young mushrooms bell-shaped or ovoid, becomes more spread over time. It has a small tubercle in the center, the middle is usually darker than the edges. The light skin is densely covered with chestnut or brown scales.

Leg (height 3-7 cm): cylindrical, tapering from bottom to top, usually hollow. Young mushrooms have a small ring.

The flesh of the lepiota is very fragile, under the skin of the cap it is light, almost white, and in the leg it is brown or dark red.

Plates: thin, usually white, in old mushrooms they can be yellow or light brown.

Doubles: none.

When it grows: from early July to mid-September in Europe and Siberia.

Lepiots - poisonous mushroomsLepiots - poisonous mushrooms

Where can you find it: on the soils of deciduous and mixed forests.

Eating: not consumed as it contains dangerous amatoxins.

Application in traditional medicine: not applicable.

Other names: chestnut umbrella.

Poisonous mushroom lepiota rough

Category: inedible.

Lepiots - poisonous mushroomsLepiots - poisonous mushrooms

Rough Lepiota aspera cap (diameter 5-15 cm): yellow, brownish or orange, dry to the touch. In young mushrooms in the form of a small egg, it changes over time to slightly convex. Small cracks or scales in adult lepiots usually fall off.

Stem (6-13 cm high): often hollow, cylindrical, with a stable ring. Lighter than the cap, rarely with small scales. Usually smooth to the touch.

Flesh: fibrous in the cap, white, darker in the stem. It has an unpleasant putrid odor and a bitter bitter taste.

Blades: frequent and uneven, white or yellowish.

Doubles: none.

Lepiota grows from early August to October in the northern countries of the Eurasian continent, North America and Africa.

Lepiots - poisonous mushroomsLepiots - poisonous mushrooms

Where to find it: In mixed forests with moist and humus-rich soil. May be found in city parks on rotten fallen leaves.

Eating: not consumed.

Application in traditional medicine (data have not been confirmed and have not undergone clinical studies!): Tincture is used to fight malignant tumors, especially effective in the treatment of sarcoma.

Other names: umbellate umbrella.

Lepiota crested poisonous

Category: inedible.

Lepiots - poisonous mushroomsLepiots - poisonous mushrooms

Hat (diameter 3-7 cm): usually reddish or brown, with a central tubercle. In young mushrooms, bell-shaped or in the form of a cone, and in old ones, it is spread. Dry, due to which it is often covered with cracks and yellow or brownish scales.

Leg (height 3-10 cm): yellow or light cream, tapering from bottom to top, cylindrical, very thin and hollow. Young mushrooms have a white ring that fades over time.

Flesh: fibrous, white. Very acidic with an extremely unpleasant chemical odor.

Doubles: relatives-lepiota lilac (Lepiota lilacea), chestnut (Lepiota castanea) and woolly (Lepiota clypeolaria). Lilac lepiota is extremely poisonous, has purple scales, chestnut and woolly scales have more and darker caps.

Eating: not consumed.

Application in traditional medicine: not applicable.

Crested lepiota grows from early July to late September in temperate countries of the Northern Hemisphere.

Other names: comb umbrella, comb silverfish.

Lepiots - poisonous mushroomsLepiots - poisonous mushrooms

Where can you find it: on the soils of coniferous and mixed forests, on forest edges or along roads. Especially often, crested lepiota grows next to pines.

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Hunting, Fishing and Mushrooms: a magazine for hunters and fishers.
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