Bulbous webcap

Bulbous webcap (Leucocortinarius bulbiger) Bulbous webcap (Leucocortinarius bulbiger) Bulbous webcap (Leucocortinarius bulbiger)

Bulbous webcap (Leucocortinarius bulbiger)

Systematics:

  • Department: Basidiomycota (Basidiomycetes)
  • Subdivision: Agaricomycotina (Agaricomycetes)
  • Class: Agaricomycetes (Agaricomycetes)
  • Subclass: Agaricomycetidae
  • Order: Agaricales (Agaric or Lamellar)
  • Family: Tricholomataceae (Tricholomaceae or Ordinary)
  • Genus: Leucocortinarius (Whiteweed)
  • Species: Leucocortinarius bulbiger

or

Tuberous white-webbed

Bulbous webcap

Hat: Diameter 4-8 cm, in young specimens it is semi-ovate or bell-shaped, gradually opens to semi-extended with age; in the center a blunt tubercle remains for a long time. The edges of the cap are covered with white remnants of the cortina, especially noticeable in young specimens; color indefinite, rolling, from cream to dirty orange, the surface is smooth and dry. The flesh of the cap is thick, soft, whitish, without any particular smell or taste.

Plates: Adherent to the tooth, frequent, narrow, white in youth, then darken to cream (unlike other cobwebs, due to the white color of the spore powder, the plates do not acquire a completely dark color even in adulthood). In young specimens, the plates are covered with a white cobweb cortina.

Spore powder: White.

Stem: Short (5-7 cm in height) and thick (1-2 cm in diameter), white, with a prominent tuberous base; the ring is white, spider-like, free. Above the ring, the leg is smooth, below it is velvety. The flesh of the leg is grayish, fibrous.

Distribution: Occurs from August to October in coniferous and mixed forests, forming mycorrhiza with pine and spruce.

Similar species: From the spiderweb family, this mushroom certainly stands out with a white spore powder and plates that do not darken until old age. A slight resemblance to an extremely unfortunate specimen of the red fly agaric (Amanita muscaria) should also be noted: the white remnants of the cortina along the edges of the cap resemble half-washed warts, and the pinkish-cream color is also not a rarity for a very faded red fly agaric. So such a distant resemblance would rather serve as a good distinguishing feature of the white-webbed rather than a reason to eat a red fly agaric by mistake.

Edible: Considered a medium quality edible mushroom.

Remarks Bulbous white-webbed is one of the few mushrooms recognizable at first sight. As I remember now: I was walking through an old spruce forest, heavily loaded with saffron milk caps and umbrellas, and suddenly noticed a flock of stocky reddish fungi. 'Bah, yes this is–', – no, of course, the word 'white-webbed' or, God forgive me, 'Leucocortinarius bulbiger' would be unnatural to remember, but recognition came instantly. Lucky, very lucky mushroom. Just pick it up and eat it.

Bulbous webcap (Leucocortinarius bulbiger) Bulbous webcap (Leucocortinarius bulbiger) Bulbous webcap (Leucocortinarius bulbiger)

Photo of the mushroom White-webbed bulbous from the questions in recognition:

Leucocortinarius bulbiger - Bulbous weevil Leucocortinarius bulbiger - Bulbous weevil Leucocortinarius bulbiger - Bulbous weevil Leucocortinarius bulbiger - Bulbous weevil 2019.02.06 Maria Leucocortinarius bulbiger - Bulbous weevil Leucocortinarius bulbiger - Bulbous weevil Leucocortinarius bulbiger - Bulbous weevil Leucocortinarius bulbiger - Bulbous weevil Leucocortinarius bulbiger - Bulbous weevil Leucocortinarius bulbiger - Bulbous weevil 2017.09.11 Valery Leucocortinarius bulbiger - Bulbous weevil Leucocortinarius bulbiger - Bulbous weevil Leucocortinarius bulbiger - Bulbous weevil Leucocortinarius bulbiger - Bulbous weevil 2017.01.25 Sergey

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Hunting, Fishing and Mushrooms: a magazine for hunters and fishers.
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